After Christmas comes the clear-up

Happy New Year from us all at Norfolk Winter! We hope you had a lovely festive break, which for some of you will still be continuing as most Norfolk schools aren’t back until next Tuesday (8 January). Not that we’re jealous or anything…

A familiar sight up and down the country on Christmas Day. But what do you do with all the wrapping when you're finished? Credit: magnificent momma

A familiar sight up and down the country on Christmas Day. But what do you do with all the wrapping when you’re done? Credit: magnificent momma

Traditionally, the Christmas period isn’t over until Twelfth Night which falls on the Saturday, 5 January, and there’s a well-known superstition that it’s unlucky to leave your Christmas decorations up past Twelfth Night.

Whether you believe such things or not, you’re likely to be thinking about de-Christmasing your home if you haven’t already. Christmas creates a lot of extra rubbish but a lot of it can be recycled, so the environment needn’t pay a high price for our festive fun.

We’ve listed below some of the ways and places you can recycle Christmas-related waste and paraphernalia in Norfolk. All the best for 2013 and thanks for reading the blog.

Christmas trees – Real trees and no-longer-wanted artificial trees can be taken to any main Norfolk County Council recycling centre. Artificial trees can be put in the ‘scrap metal’ container. Real trees can be put in the garden waste bin. Some gardening centres also accept real Christmas trees, ask in store to be sure.

Christmas cards – You can put these in the cardboard container at any main recycling centre. You should be able to put cards which don’t have any glitter, glue or other bits and bobs on them in your recycling bin at home too.

You may not have this many to shift but don't forget empty bottles can be taken to your local recycling centre. Credit: Vaughn Hannon
You may not have this many to shift but don’t forget empty bottles can be taken to your local recycling centre. Credit: Vaughn Hannon

Envelopes – These can also be taken to main recycling centres and put in the paperbin for recycling. Any other County Council-run recycling centre or recycling point that has a paper bank also accepts them. Some kerbside recycling collections may accept them, but not all do because of the glue. Check with your district council if unsure.

Wrapping paper – Again, you can take this to any main recycling centre to be recycled, however shiny or foil-like wrapping paper can’t be recycled there and has to go in the ‘waste to landfill’ bin. If in doubt, ask an assistant at the centre.

Glass bottles – Imagine there might be empty ones of these knocking around in some homes! All main recycling centres accept these for recycling, put them in the glass banks. They can also be accepted at other recycling centres or recycling points where there is a glass bank.

Have your fairy lights given up the ghost? Don't throw them out...take them to a recycling centre and you could be in with a chance of winning a prize. Credit: shesarii

Have your fairy lights given up the ghost? Don’t throw them out…take them to a recycling centre and you could be in with a chance of winning a prize. Credit: shesarii

Fairy lights and other unwanted or broken electricals – If your fairy lights have seen better days or a Christmas present means you want to get rid of an old set of hair straighteners, television or blender, all of these can be recycled at the County Council’s main recycling centres. In fact, anything that needs a plug or batteries to work can be taken along and what’s more by doing so in 2013 you stand the chance of winning £100 worth of vouchers from shops including Amazon, Debenhams or any supermarket. There are more details on how to enter the prize draw here. Working electrical items may also be accepted by some charity shops, check in-store first.

Toys, furniture and other duplicated presents – You can take lots of working, non-electrical items that you don’t want or need anymore to Reuse Shops that operate at main recycling centres at Caister, Dereham, Hempton, Ketteringham, King’s Lynn, Mayton Wood and Thetford. Books, crockery, games, bikes, mirrors – virtually all household items can be donated and they’re then put up for resale in the shops on site, with some of the proceeds going to charities and local community groups.

Furniture and other household items can also be donated to Norfolk Homemakers, a registered charity that provides furniture and other household goods to people in need on low incomes. They can often come and collect items from your home, but due to costs they may ask for a donation.

There are 20 main recycling centres in Norfolk, find more information about them, where they are and when they’re open here. There’s general information about recycling in Norfolk here, including composting and business waste.

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